FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Returns condition(UK customers)

You may return, exchange or receive a refund on your glasses if you are unhappy with them for any reason. Just follow these easy steps:

  • Fill in the returns form sent with your original order;
  • Peel off the included returns label and stick it on the delivery envelope or box you received your glasses in;
  • Pop the frame(s) you want to return, with their case and cloth, back in the delivery envelope or box, along with the returns form;
  • Send us the package so it reaches us within 30 days of the original dispatch date (90 days for bifocals and varifocals).

Returns must be in their original condition and with all accessories included in your package (e.g. cases and cloths).

When you do return product we recommend that you obtain proof of postage from the Post Office as we are unable to take responsibility for packages lost in post. Your statutory rights in relation to returns and refunds are not affected. See also section 11 of the terms and conditions, Your right to cancel.

International returns

You may return, exchange or receive a refund on your glasses if you are unhappy with them for any reason. Just follow these easy steps:

  • Fill in the returns form sent with your original order;
  • Pop the frame(s) you want to return, with their case and cloth, back in the delivery envelope or box, along with the returns form;
  • Pay for return postage. Unfortunately, we are unable to cover return shipping for international returns;
  • Send us the package so it reaches us within 45 days of the original dispatch date (90 days for bifocals and varifocals).

Returns must be in their original condition and with all accessories included in your package (e.g. cases and cloths).

When you do return any glasses we recommend that you obtain proof of postage or use a recorded delivery service via a courier company, as we are unable to take responsibility for packages lost in post. Your statutory rights in relation to returns and refunds are not affected. See also section 11 of the terms and conditions, Your right to cancel.

What do the frame measurements mean?

On the inside of one of the arms of your frames you will usually find three printed measurements – the first two separated by a rectangle and then a 3 digit number, like this:

In this instance:

  • 56 is the lens diameter,
  • 16is the bridge width, and
  • 145 is the side/arm length

What is my Pupilary Distance (PD), and how do I obtain it?

PD is the distance from the centre of the pupil (black circular area) in one eye to the centre of the pupil in the other eye. This measurement allows the lab technician to fit the lenses so when the glasses are worn you are automatically looking through the centre of the lens, thus achieving the correct and clearest vision.

Your optician may or may not give you the PD (the optician is not required to do so as part of your eye test). Your optician can provide this measurement as your PD is always measured during an eye test. We therefore recommend that you ask for it when you have your eyes tested.

Alternatively, you may choose to use an average PD, which is provided for you by our dispensing optician on the order form.

In many high street opticians, sales staff with no optical qualifications take PD measurements. Therefore, If you would like to measure your own PD, you can do so by taking the following steps:

1. You need an assistant (a friend!) to help you.

2. You need to Focus on a fixed point in the distance, for example; window at the end of the room.

3. Whilst you are focusing on the distance, with a ruler your friend measures the distance between the centres of one pupil to the centre of the other in millimetres. The average PD is normally between 54 and 70mm.

4. When difficulty is experienced in determining the centre of the pupil, the edge of the pupil or iris may be used as a measuring point if both pupils are the same size. Measurement is read from the left side of one pupil to the left side of the othe other pupil.

 

OR you can do it yourself by looking in the mirror.


 
 
 

What your prescription real mean?

What your prescription really means

what does your prescription mean

Ever wondered what all the symbols and numbers on your prescription mean?

+ or -

+’ – Shows if you are long sighted (longsightedness)

-‘ – Shows if you are short sighted (shortsightedness)

PD

PD – Pupillary distance is the distance between your eyes measured between your pupil centre points

SPH

SPH – Spherical number shows how strong the correction needs to be

CYL

CYL – Cylinder number shows how much astigmatism you have

AXIS

AXIS – Axis shows the position of the cylinder and will be between 1 & 180

PRISM

PRISM – This shows if you have a muscle imbalance in your eye

BASE

BASE – This shows the direction of the prism in your lens

ADD

ADD – This will indicate if you need a prescription for reading. Is applied to bifocal and varifocal lenses to correct presbyopia

Common layouts of prescriptions

Below are examples of prescriptions. The first set are standard prescriptions. Look through these to get a feel. Typed prescriptions are generally quite easy to understand, it’s mostly handwritten ones that cause problems.

At the end of the page are examples of unusual cases you may encounter, with instructions for what to do. Skip straight to the more unusual items.

This is a standard NHS prescription:

NHS standard prescription

It would be written as follows:

NHS standard prescription solution

Dolland & Aitchinson

Dolland & Aitchinson example

  • This time the signs have been written ABOVE the numbers – they are still just standard +/- signs
  • Also, they optician has written 125 instead of 1.25. It should still be entered as ‘1.25’ with a decimal point.
  • There is only one value for Near ADD, this should be entered for both eyes.

It would be written as follows:

Dolland & Aitchinson solution

Specsavers

Specsavers example

It would be written as follows:

Specsavers solution

Vision express

Vision Express example

Here the additions are placed away from the rest of the prescription, it would be written as follows: Vision Express solution

More unusual figures

Sometimes figures like this appear on your prescription. These are not needed to make your lenses. Figures not needed

Some prescriptions have this figure, which looks like a sideways 8. This means ‘infinity’. And you should select ‘infinity’ from the list. Infinity example

This prescription also has some figures scrawled underneath these are Additions for both intermediate and near distances. Even though it’s a single figure, it applies to both eyes.

Additions example

This would be written like this: NOTE: Use the “My prescription is more complex than this…” link to show you this more advanced prescription area Addition solution

Sometimes opticians write ‘DS’ in the CYL column. This simply means there is no astigmatism, and you can enter either nothing (leave the field blank) or select the phrase DS in the drop down.

No astigmatism example

What about lens coatings?

We offer a number of different lens coatings. Most lenses can now have special coatings applied which enhance your vision as well as improve the appearance of your spectacles. Some of the most popular lens coating are outlined below.

  • Scratch-resistant coating: Often referred to as ‘Hard coating’. Most people choose plastic lenses because they’re lighter than glass and less likely to break. But plastic scratches more easily than glass. So to prolong the life of your lenses, we recommend a scratch-resistant coating. Please note, this coating is designed to prevent minor scratches as opposed to all types of scratches.
  • Anti-reflective coating: An anti-reflection coating virtually eliminates the light reflected from the surface of spectacle lenses. This has many benefits. Firstly, you will look better when wearing your glasses because there are no distracting reflections to get in the way of normal eye contact. Secondly, a reduction in reflected light can enhance your vision and reduce eye strain. For example, helps reduce headlight glare when driving at night. It is also recommended for computer users.
  • UV-400 protective coating: Excessive exposure to the sun’s ultra violet rays can be harmful to your eyes and may cause long term eye damage. If you are at risk then a UV filter coating for your lenses is advisable.

Note: One or more coatings can be combine

How do I obtain my prescription?

Simply go to any high-street optician for an eye examination. They will give you all the details you will need to complete an order on our website.

If you’re worried about feeling rude asking for your prescription and not buying anything from them then don’t! It’s perfectly normal, and they will never refuse to give you your details. They are legally obliged to give you a copy if you request one, and you are also under no obligation to buy frames or lenses from the optician you obtained your prescription from.

How can you charge such low prices?

We’re glad you asked! It’s actually very simple. For years, the only place you could buy prescription glasses was on a high-street or specialist opticians store. With the advent of the Web it seemed natural to start using it as a platform for commerce, because there are several benefits that the “brick and mortar" stores simply can’t enjoy. For instance:

  1. We don’t have to pay high rents for large high street shops
  2. We don’t have to employ a large number of retail sales staff as high street stores do
  3. We aren’t limited to the number of different frames we offer, because we have an inifinite amount of “wall space" to display our stock
  4. We have years of honest reliable relationships and contacts with fellow optical manufacturers and optical laboratories

Ultimately what it all comes down to is great savings on great glasses for you and your family

× How can I help you?